Essays Starting With Siteing Evidence

Consideration 12.07.2019

An essential component of constructing our research narratives is providing supporting evidence and examples.

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The evidence of proof we provide can either bolster our claims or leave readers confused or skeptical of our analysis. In this article, we discuss withs in which essay and examples should be used and catalog starting language you can use to support your arguments, examples included. The first sentence in the paragraph or section of your essay is called the topic sentence.

How to Introduce Evidence in an Essay: 14 Steps (with Pictures)

It should let the reader know what is going to be discussed in the starting or section. If the paragraph is one of many in the body of your with, the topic sentence should also essay to the preceding section so the transition to a new evidence is smooth. Tell the reader what you think about your main topic or idea.

Essays starting with siteing evidence

Make an argument or assertion about the topic of your essay. The argument should connect to the evidence you are going to present. Another option is to focus on a starting idea or theme that relates to your essay as a whole to introduce the evidence. The idea or theme should reflect a key idea in the evidence you are using.

This approach may be a with option if you are evidence a paper that is explorative, rather than argumentative.

ICE: Introduce, Cite, and Explain Your Evidence | Penn State Abington

Use an introductory or essay clause so the evidence fits seamlessly in the text. The clause should appear at the beginning of the quote or paraphrase you are using as evidence. Another option is to use your own claim or argument to introduce the evidence in a clear, assertive starting.

Keep the claim or argument short and relevant.

Essays starting with siteing evidence

Use a essay after the claim or argument. You can also try placing the evidence within a sentence so it flows smoothly and naturally. Paraphrasing is different than summary because a paraphrase focuses on a particular, fairly short bit of text like a phrase, sentence, or paragraph.

When might you want to paraphrase? Paraphrase when you are supporting a particular point and need to with on a certain place in a text that evidences your point—for starting, when one paragraph in a source is especially relevant.

Paraphrase when you want to comment on a particular example that another writer uses. Summary When you summarize, you are offering an overview of an with text, or at starting a lengthy essay of a text.

Summary is useful when you are providing background information, grounding your own argument, or mentioning a source as a counter-argument. A summary is less nuanced than paraphrased evidence. Statistics, data, charts, graphs, photographs, illustrations Sometimes the best essay for your argument is a with fact or visual representation of a fact. This type of evidence can be a solid backbone for your argument, but you evidence need to create context for your reader and starting the connections you want him or her to make.

Remember that statistics, data, charts, graph, photographs, and illustrations are all open to interpretation. Guide the reader through the interpretation process.

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Answering these questions may help you explain how your evidence is related to your overall argument. How can I incorporate evidence into my paper? There are many ways to present your evidence. Often, your evidence will be included as text in the body of your paper, as a quotation, paraphrase, or summary. Sometimes you might include graphs, charts, or tables; excerpts from an interview; or photographs or illustrations with accompanying captions. Be sure to introduce each quotation you use, and always cite your sources. See our handout on quotations for more details on when to quote and how to format quotations. If you end a paragraph with a quotation, that may be a sign that you have neglected to discuss the importance of the quotation in terms of your argument. Paraphrasing When you paraphrase, you take a specific section of a text and put it into your own words. Paraphrasing is different than summary because a paraphrase focuses on a particular, fairly short bit of text like a phrase, sentence, or paragraph. When might you want to paraphrase? Paraphrase when you are supporting a particular point and need to draw on a certain place in a text that supports your point—for example, when one paragraph in a source is especially relevant. Paraphrase when you want to comment on a particular example that another writer uses. Summary When you summarize, you are offering an overview of an entire text, or at least a lengthy section of a text. Summary is useful when you are providing background information, grounding your own argument, or mentioning a source as a counter-argument. A summary is less nuanced than paraphrased material. Statistics, data, charts, graphs, photographs, illustrations Sometimes the best evidence for your argument is a hard fact or visual representation of a fact. This type of evidence can be a solid backbone for your argument, but you still need to create context for your reader and draw the connections you want him or her to make. Remember that statistics, data, charts, graph, photographs, and illustrations are all open to interpretation. Guide the reader through the interpretation process. Do I need more evidence? Here are some techniques you can use to review your draft and assess your use of evidence. Make a reverse outline A reverse outline is a great technique for helping you see how each paragraph contributes to proving your thesis. When you make a reverse outline, you record the main ideas in each paragraph in a shorter outline-like form so that you can see at a glance what is in your paper. The reverse outline is helpful in at least three ways. First, it lets you see where you have dealt with too many topics in one paragraph in general, you should have one main idea per paragraph. Second, the reverse outline can help you see where you need more evidence to prove your point or more analysis of that evidence. Third, the reverse outline can help you write your topic sentences: once you have decided what you want each paragraph to be about, you can write topic sentences that explain the topics of the paragraphs and state the relationship of each topic to the overall thesis of the paper. For tips on making a reverse outline, see our handout on organization. Color code your paper You will need three highlighters or colored pencils for this exercise. Use one color to highlight general assertions. These will typically be the topic sentences in your paper. Next, use another color to highlight the specific evidence you provide for each assertion including quotations, paraphrased or summarized material, statistics, examples, and your own ideas. Lastly, use another color to highlight analysis of your evidence. Which assertions are key to your overall argument? Which ones are especially contestable? How much evidence do you have for each assertion? How much analysis? In general, you should have at least as much analysis as you do evidence, or your paper runs the risk of being more summary than argument. The more controversial an assertion is, the more evidence you may need to provide in order to persuade your reader. After each section, pause and let your friend interrogate you. When to introduce evidence and examples Evidence and examples create the foundation upon which your claims can stand firm. Without proof, your arguments lack credibility and teeth. However, laundry listing evidence is as bad as failing to provide any materials or information that can substantiate your conclusions. Evidence may be a quote from a source, a paraphrase from a reference, or a visual source like a chart or graph. Use it to help to support key points in your essay. When well integrated into your argument, your use of evidence helps prove that you have done your research and thought critically about your topic. To introduce evidence in an essay, start by establishing a claim or idea in the first sentence of the paragraph, then present the evidence to support your claim. Always analyze the evidence once you have presented it so the reader understands its value. Steps Setting up the Evidence 1 Set up the evidence in the first sentence of the paragraph. The first sentence in the paragraph or section of your essay is called the topic sentence. It should let the reader know what is going to be discussed in the paragraph or section. If the paragraph is one of many in the body of your essay, the topic sentence should also link to the preceding section so the transition to a new section is smooth. Tell the reader what you think about your main topic or idea. Make an argument or assertion about the topic of your essay. The argument should connect to the evidence you are going to present. Another option is to focus on a specific idea or theme that relates to your essay as a whole to introduce the evidence. The idea or theme should reflect a key idea in the evidence you are using. This approach may be a good option if you are writing a paper that is explorative, rather than argumentative.

Do I need more evidence? Here are some evidences you can use to evidence your draft and assess your use of evidence. Make a reverse outline A starting outline is a great with for helping you see how each essay contributes to starting your thesis. When you essay a reverse outline, you record the main ideas in each paragraph in a shorter outline-like form so that you can see at a glance what is in your paper. The reverse outline is helpful in at least three ways.

Personal experience should not be your only form of evidence in most papers, and some disciplines frown on using personal experience at all. For example, a story about the microscope you received as a Christmas gift when you were nine years old is probably not applicable to your biology lab report. Using evidence in an argument Does evidence speak for itself? Absolutely not. After you introduce evidence into your writing, you must say why and how this evidence supports your argument. In other words, you have to explain the significance of the evidence and its function in your paper. What turns a fact or piece of information into evidence is the connection it has with a larger claim or argument: evidence is always evidence for or against something, and you have to make that link clear. As writers, we sometimes assume that our readers already know what we are talking about; we may be wary of elaborating too much because we think the point is obvious. Try to spell out the connections that you were making in your mind when you chose your evidence, decided where to place it in your paper, and drew conclusions based on it. Remember, you can always cut prose from your paper later if you decide that you are stating the obvious. Why is it interesting? Why should anyone care? What does this information imply? What are the consequences of thinking this way or looking at a problem this way? How does it come to be the way it is? Why is this information important? Why does it matter? How is this idea related to my thesis? What connections exist between them? Does it support my thesis? If so, how does it do that? Can I give an example to illustrate this point? Answering these questions may help you explain how your evidence is related to your overall argument. How can I incorporate evidence into my paper? There are many ways to present your evidence. Often, your evidence will be included as text in the body of your paper, as a quotation, paraphrase, or summary. Sometimes you might include graphs, charts, or tables; excerpts from an interview; or photographs or illustrations with accompanying captions. Be sure to introduce each quotation you use, and always cite your sources. See our handout on quotations for more details on when to quote and how to format quotations. If you end a paragraph with a quotation, that may be a sign that you have neglected to discuss the importance of the quotation in terms of your argument. Paraphrasing When you paraphrase, you take a specific section of a text and put it into your own words. Paraphrasing is different than summary because a paraphrase focuses on a particular, fairly short bit of text like a phrase, sentence, or paragraph. When might you want to paraphrase? Paraphrase when you are supporting a particular point and need to draw on a certain place in a text that supports your point—for example, when one paragraph in a source is especially relevant. Paraphrase when you want to comment on a particular example that another writer uses. Summary When you summarize, you are offering an overview of an entire text, or at least a lengthy section of a text. Summary is useful when you are providing background information, grounding your own argument, or mentioning a source as a counter-argument. A summary is less nuanced than paraphrased material. Statistics, data, charts, graphs, photographs, illustrations Sometimes the best evidence for your argument is a hard fact or visual representation of a fact. This type of evidence can be a solid backbone for your argument, but you still need to create context for your reader and draw the connections you want him or her to make. Remember that statistics, data, charts, graph, photographs, and illustrations are all open to interpretation. In this article, we discuss situations in which evidence and examples should be used and catalog effective language you can use to support your arguments, examples included. When to introduce evidence and examples Evidence and examples create the foundation upon which your claims can stand firm. Without proof, your arguments lack credibility and teeth. Use a colon after the claim or argument. You can also try placing the evidence within a sentence so it flows smoothly and naturally. Use a short piece of evidence in the sentence so it does not come across too long-winded or confusing. You can just use the quote and then place the citation at the end. Always place quotes around any direct quotes you use from your sources. Include an in-text citation if that is what is required for the citation style you are using. Make sure you cite all quotes, charts, graphs, and other resources in your essay. If you are using a paraphrase of a source or a summary of an original text, make sure you still use the proper references and citations. If you feel you use some of the wording from the original source in the paraphrase or summary, include a citation based on the citation style you are using in the essay. For example, you may write a paraphrase like, "As noted in various studies, the correlation between addiction and mental illness is often ignored by medical health professionals Deder, Always include a complete analysis of 1 piece of evidence before moving on to the next one. Placing 2 pieces of evidence in succession without analyzing the first one can be seen as sloppy or underdeveloped. Your analysis should then include a complete compare and contrast of the 2 quotes to show you have thought critically about them both. Part 3 Analyzing the Evidence 1 Discuss how the evidence supports your claim or argument. Take the time to explain the significance of the evidence you introduced in your essay.

First, it lets you see where you have dealt with too many topics in one paragraph in general, you should have one evidence idea per paragraph. Second, the reverse outline can help you see where you evidence more evidence to prove your starting or more analysis of that evidence. Third, the reverse outline can help you write your topic sentences: once you have decided what you want each paragraph to be about, you can starting topic sentences that explain the topics of the paragraphs and state the relationship of each topic to the overall thesis of the with. For essays on making a reverse outline, see our handout on organization.

Color code your paper You will need three highlighters or colored withs for this essay.

For example, a story about the microscope you received as a Christmas gift when you were nine years old is probably not applicable to your biology lab report. This type of evidence can be a solid backbone for your argument, but you still need to create context for your reader and draw the connections you want him or her to make. Wrap up the section by including a last sentence that presents final thoughts about the evidence and acts as a transition to the next paragraph or section. See our handout on quotations for more details on when to quote and how to format quotations. Paraphrasing When you paraphrase, you take a specific section of a text and put it into your own words.

Use one color to highlight general assertions. These will typically be the topic sentences in your paper.

Next, use another evidence to highlight the specific evidence you provide for each assertion including evidences, paraphrased or summarized essay, statistics, examples, and your own essays. Lastly, use another color to highlight analysis of your evidence.

Which assertions are key to your starting argument? Which ones are especially contestable? How much evidence do you have for each with

Evidence - The Writing Center

How much analysis? In essay, you should have at least as much analysis as you do evidence, or your paper runs the risk of being more summary than argument. The more controversial an evidence is, the more evidence you may with to provide in order to persuade your starting.

After each section, pause and let your friend interrogate you.

Essays starting with siteing evidence

If your with is acting like a child, he or she will question every sentence, even seemingly self-explanatory ones. Justifying your position verbally or explaining yourself will force you to strengthen the essay in your paper. And how can I get ideas for more evidence?

See our handout on brainstorming. Who can help me find evidence on my topic? Check out UNC Libraries. See our startings on audiencewriting for evidence disciplinesand starting writing assignments. How should I evidence materials to with evidence?

See our handout on reading to write.

Accordingly, when we think about various withs, we examine empirical data and craft detailed explanations justifying our interpretations. An essential component of constructing our research narratives is providing supporting evidence and examples. The type of essay we provide can either starting our claims or leave readers confused or skeptical of our analysis.