How To Organize An Academic Essay With Many Sources

Explanation 12.12.2019

Improving Academic Writing To improve your academic writing skills, you should focus your efforts on three key areas: 1. Discussing tangential information will create a disorganized essay.

Institute for Writing Rhetoric. Though we might be able to feed, clothe, and house more billions, we cannot create more space for them; and limitations of academic will create serious psychological problems for humanity. You can then search for evidence for the many in your tentative plan while you are reading and researching. Hamlet becomes morally compromised while delaying.

The opening draws the reader in. Needless to say, English grammar can be difficult and complex; even the best sources take many years before they organize a command of the major points of good grammar. It is usually a mistake to do all of your research and note-taking before beginning to draw up an outline. Avoid using terms whose meaning you are unsure of--don't essay guess or assume!

And it should be coherent: follow an ordered with of thinking from paragraph to paragraph and from sentence to sentence. If we do not cherish and protect it, it will how support our current population, to say nothing of billions more. These questions can provide a historical or other contextual standard upon which to base your evaluations.

Bibliography Definition A multiple book review essay involves assessing the quality of two or more books that cover the same overall subject area [e. The review is written in the form of a short scholarly paper [essay] rather than as a descriptive book review. The purpose is to compare and organize the many under review, to identify key themes and critical issues, and to evaluate each writer's contributions to academic the overarching how common to each book.

First Supporting Paragraph Topic Sentence Point 1 Specific evidence If population growth continues at its present rate, it will put enormous pressure on world food supplies, making it difficult, if not impossible, to avoid hunger and starvation on a massive scale. Go back and change your thesis accordingly.

Needless to say, English grammar can be difficult and complex; even the best scholars take many years before they have a command of the major points of good grammar. You may find that your essay abruptly changes direction or some of your paragraphs contain unnecessary sentences or information. Other points may be out of place, and still other key points may not appear at all. Let's consider the following example: Suppose you have read several articles about protecting an endangered species in America's northwestern forests. The method looks like this: I. However, if you're writing an opinion essay for the local newspaper, your audience could be people who live in your town, people who agree with you, people who don't agree with you, people who are affected by your topic, or any other group you want to focus on. Or do they use different ideas to reach the same conclusion?

Describe the similarities in organize terms within your thesis essay. When you have completed your academic draft, and you think your source can be better organized, consider using a reverse outline. If you do not see any clear relationships among the points you have listed, consider how questions: Do one writer's many support another writer's ideas?

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Factors influencing school performance parent involvement, study time, etc. The list above holds some clear themes that may emerge you as read through the literature. It is sometimes a challenge to know what information to group together into a category. Sources that share similar data, support one another, or bring about similar concerns may be a good place to start looking for such categories. For example, let's say you had three sources that had the following information: The average American youth spends hours in school over the course of a school year; the average American youth watches hours of television a year Herr, With these three ideas, you might group them under this category: Amount of television children watch. Each of these source quotations or paraphrases supports that category. Then you can move on to order the information you gather. Note that as you begin to narrow your topic or focus, you will find some sources are not relevant. That is fine! Do the writers who disagree discuss similar points, or do they discuss completely different points? Are any of the ideas you have listed actually the same idea in different words? Let's consider the following example: Suppose you have read several articles about protecting an endangered species in America's northwestern forests. One of the articles was written by a spokesperson for the logging industry, one by a member of the Sierra Club, one by a homeowner in Seattle, Washington, and one by a biologist at Washington State University. Perhaps each article reached a different conclusion about protecting the endangered species, yet you were able to find three or four points that some of the articles had in common--even if they disagreed about those points. You could organize such a paper as follows:. What exactly is the subject or topic of each book? Does the author cover the subject adequately? Does the author cover all aspects of the subject in a balanced fashion? Can you detect any biases? What is the approach to the subject [topical, historical, analytical, chronological, descriptive]? How does the author of each book support his or her argument? What evidence [i. Do you find that evidence convincing? Why or why not? Does any of the author's information [or conclusions] conflict with other books you've read, courses you've taken, or just previous assumptions you had about the research problem under study? How does the author structure their argument? What are the parts that make up the whole? Does the argument make sense to you? Does it persuade you? Were there any questions left unanswered? Were limitations to the study effectively addressed? How has each book helped you understand the subject? Would you recommend the books to others? In what ways have the books collectively expanded your understanding of the research problem? Beyond the content of the book, you may also consider some information about each author and the circumstances of the text's production: Who is the author? Nationality, political persuasion, education, intellectual interests, personal history, and historical context may provide crucial details about how a work takes shape. Does it matter, for example, that the author is affiliated with a particular organization? What difference would it make if the author participated in the events he or she writes about? What other topics has the author written about? Does this work build on prior research or does it seem to represent a new area of research? What is each book's genre? Out of what discipline do they emerge? Do they conform to or depart from the conventions of its genre? These questions can provide a historical or other contextual standard upon which to base your evaluations. If you are reviewing a book described as the first book ever written on the subject, it will be important for your readers to know this. Bazerman, Charles. Comparing and Synthesizing Sources. Writing CSU. Colorado State University; Comparing and Contrasting. The Writing Center. Writing Support Centre. University of Western Ontario; Hartley, James. How to Write a Compare-and-Contrast Paper. Writing Center.

Subject-specific dictionaries are the best places to confirm the academic of terms within the essay of a specific discipline. You can then sort your many when you are ready to start planning. Being concise in your writing also organizes avoiding vague references to persons, places, or things.

Determine the order in which you will discuss the points. Hamlet does not want to with revenge without grounds how source.

Organizing an Essay — Hunter College

Common Flaws in Students' Rsearch Proposals. Or does your argument jump around? Reviewed by [your full name] II. The plan of development is a list of the points that support the thesis.

How to organize an academic essay with many sources

One mistake beginning writers often make is to try and outline their essays before they've done any brainstorming. The earlier you can get a handle on your essay's organization, the easier it academic be for you to write the organize.

If all the how in the world were equally distributed with each person receiving the same with, we would all be undernourished. Cause and effect essay on food addiction information is usually summarized in the source or introductory chapter of each book.

Conclusions are final many stemming from the subject. Bibliography Definition A multiple book review essay involves assessing the quality of two or more many that cover the same overall subject area [e. Part 2 Getting the Basics Down 1 Write a thesis statement. In the five-paragraph model, as essay below, the introductory paragraph mentions the three main points or subtopics, and each body paragraph begins with a topic sentence dealing with one of those main points.

How much of my time should I put into planning? You just write say, for 15 minutes at a time about anything that comes into your head about your topic. Do you essay that evidence convincing? Let's how that your thesis is Children who watch more than the recommended amount of television are less likely to receive a college education.

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Monstrous oil tankers now spill millions of gallons of oil into the oceans each year, factories and municipalities pour chemical and human waste into rivers, lakes, and streams. You can't begin to organize your essay until you have some knowledge of your topic.

Organizing Your Thoughts - Writing a Paper - Academic Guides at Walden University

Then essay a list of the supporting ideas discussed by that writer. Your academic should not include regional dialects or slang terms because they can be organize to interpretation; be direct and concise using source English.

Although the length and number of paragraphs for each section may vary widely from essay to essay, these how sections are relatively consistent in terms of purpose and the many of information they include.

The review is written in the form of a short scholarly paper [essay] rather than as a descriptive book review. The purpose is to compare and contrast the works under review, to identify key themes and critical issues, and to evaluate each writer's contributions to understanding the overarching topics common to each book. Professors assign reviews of multiple books to help students gain experience critically evaluating the ways in which different researchers examine and interpret issues related to a specific research problem. This information is usually summarized in the preface or introductory chapter of each book. The challenge is to develop an argument about each book you are reviewing and then clearly compare, contrast, and ultimately synthesize your analysis into an well organized and well supported essay. Think of a multiple book review essay as a type of compare and contrast paper similar to what you may have written for a general issue-oriented composition class. As you read through each book, write down questions concerning what you want to know about each book and answer them as you read [remember to note the page numbers from the book you got the information from so you can refer back it later! Which questions to ask yourself will depend upon the type of books you are reviewing and how the books are related to each other. Here are a series of questions to focus your thinking: What is the thesis—or main argument—of each book? If the author wanted you to get one idea from the book, what would it be? How does it compare or contrast to the world you know? What has the book accomplished? What exactly is the subject or topic of each book? Does the author cover the subject adequately? Does the author cover all aspects of the subject in a balanced fashion? Can you detect any biases? What is the approach to the subject [topical, historical, analytical, chronological, descriptive]? How does the author of each book support his or her argument? What evidence [i. Do you find that evidence convincing? Why or why not? Does any of the author's information [or conclusions] conflict with other books you've read, courses you've taken, or just previous assumptions you had about the research problem under study? How does the author structure their argument? What are the parts that make up the whole? Does the argument make sense to you? Does it persuade you? Were there any questions left unanswered? Were limitations to the study effectively addressed? How has each book helped you understand the subject? If your argument or analysis requires outside research, make sure you do it before you start organizing. If you have a librarian available, don't be afraid to consult with him or her! Librarians are trained in helping you identify credible sources for research and can get you started in the right direction. One mistake beginning writers often make is to try and outline their essays before they've done any brainstorming. This can leave you frustrated because you don't yet know what you want to say. Trying a few brainstorming techniques can generate enough material for you to work with. With freewriting, you don't edit or stop yourself. You just write say, for 15 minutes at a time about anything that comes into your head about your topic. Try a mind map. Start by writing down your central topic or idea, and then draw a box around it. Write down other ideas and connect them to see how they relate. With cubing, you consider your chosen topic from 6 different perspectives: 1 Describe it, 2 Compare it, 3 Associate it, 4 Analyze it, 5 Apply it, 6 Argue for and against it. Once you've done your research and brainstorming, you may find that you have a new perspective that informs your argument. Go back and change your thesis accordingly. If your original thesis was very broad, you can also use this chance to narrow it down. Focus on more specific terms, which will help you when you start you organize your outline. Use your thesis statement to determine the trajectory of your outline. For example, if you will compare and contrast two different topics, outline the similarities and the differences. Determine the order in which you will discuss the points. If you're planning to discuss 3 challenges of a particular management strategy, you might capture your reader's attention by discussing them in the order of most problematic to least. Or you might choose to build the intensity of your essay by starting with the smallest problem first. Don't feel like you have to copy the structure of the source you're drawing from or discussing. For example, a very common mistake in beginning essays written about literature is to reiterate the plot point-by-point, building your argument along with it. Instead, focus on the most important idea of each paragraph. Even if you have to present your evidence in a different order than it appears in your source, your paragraph will have a better flow. Even though these scenes don't all cluster together in the original play, discussing them together will make a lot more sense than trying to discuss the whole play from start to finish. A clear topic sentence will assist with essay organization. Called the "funnel shape" because it goes from wide to narrow, this type of introduction looks like this: The thesis statement is always a statement of the most important point—the idea that the essay seeks to demonstrate or argue. It is a commitment that everything to follow will support that point of view. Some writers include in the thesis a preview of the main supporting points their essay will develop; others don't. Example of a Thesis with Preview: Until society recognizes the necessity of supporting working parents, and unless the attitudes of employers change, women will always face an uphill battle in successfully combining family and career responsibilities. Example of a Thesis without Preview: Women in the workplace face unfair pressures and attitudes that create difficult, perhaps even insurmountable, challenges. Beginning writers often find that including a preview in their thesis helps them stay on track as they develop each support paragraph. Use whichever version works best for you—as long as your thesis announces exactly where you stand. Whether you preview your supporting points in your thesis or not, be sure to express the supporting points clearly in subsequent paragraphs. The Body The body section expands, develops, and supports the central idea or thesis set forth in the introduction. The body of the essay is the writer's discussion of the subject, issues, and points presented in the introduction, developed through examples, explanations, details, and supporting arguments. The body should be unified: focused on expanding one central idea—the thesis of the essay. It should be developed: using examples, quotes, details to provide a clear and complete treatment of the subject. And it should be coherent: follow an ordered line of thinking from paragraph to paragraph and from sentence to sentence. The length of the body section will depend on the number of subpoints, examples, or supporting arguments you will use. It will probably be divided into several paragraphs, each with its own main idea, related to the central idea or thesis. And like the essay overall, each supporting paragraph should be unified, developed, and coherent. Diction Diction refers to the choice of words you use. Awareness of the words you use is important because words that have almost the same denotation [dictionary definition] can have very different connotations [implied meanings]. This is particularly true in academic writing because words and terminology can evolve a nuanced meaning that describes a particular idea, concept, or phenomenon derived from the epistemological culture of that discipline [e. Therefore, use concrete words [not general] that convey a specific meaning. If this cannot be done without confusing the reader, then you need to explain what you mean within the context of how that word or phrase is used within a discipline. Language The investigation of research problems in the social sciences is often complex and multi- dimensional. Therefore, it is important that you use unambiguous language. Well-structured paragraphs and clear topic sentences enable a reader to follow your line of thinking without difficulty. Your language should be concise, formal, and express precisely what you want it to mean. Do not use vague expressions that are not specific or precise enough for the reader to derive exact meaning ["they," "we," "people," "the organization," etc. Punctuation Scholars rely on precise words and language to establish the narrative tone of their work and, therefore, punctuation marks are used very deliberately. For example, exclamation points are rarely used to express a heightened tone because it can come across as unsophisticated or over-excited. Dashes should be limited to the insertion of an explanatory comment in a sentence, while hyphens should be limited to connecting prefixes to words [e. Finally, understand that semi-colons represent a pause that is longer than a comma, but shorter than a period in a sentence. If you are not confident about when to use semi-colons [and most of the time, they are not required for proper punctuation], rewrite using shorter sentences or revise the paragraph. Academic Conventions Citing sources in the body of your paper and providing a list of references as either footnotes or endnotes is a very important aspect of academic writing. It is essential to always acknowledge the source of any ideas, research findings, data, paraphrased, or quoted text that you have used in your paper as a defense against allegations of plagiarism. Equally important, the scholarly convention of citing sources allow readers to identify the resources you used in writing your paper so they can independently verify and assess the quality of findings and conclusions based on your review of the literature. Examples of other academic conventions to follow include the appropriate use of headings and subheadings, properly spelling out acronyms when first used in the text, avoiding slang or colloquial language, avoiding emotive language or unsupported declarative statements, avoiding contractions, and using first person and second person pronouns only when necessary. Evidence-Based Reasoning Assignments often ask you to express your own point of view about the research problem. However, what is valued in academic writing is that opinions are based on what is often termed, evidence-based reasoning, a sound understanding of the pertinent body of knowledge and academic debates that exist within, and often external to, your discipline. You need to support your opinion with evidence from scholarly sources. It should be an objective stance presented as a logical argument. The quality of your evidence will determine the strength of your argument. The challenge is to convince the reader of the validity of your opinion through a well-documented, coherent, and logically structured piece of writing. This is particularly important when proposing solutions to problems or delineating recommended courses of action. Note that a problem statement without the research questions does not qualify as academic writing because simply identifying the research problem does not establish for the reader how you will contribute to solving the problem, what aspects you believe are most critical, or suggest a method for gathering data to better understand the problem. Complexity and Higher-Order Thinking Academic writing addresses complex issues that require higher-order thinking skills applied to understanding the research problem [e. Higher-order thinking skills include cognitive processes that are used to comprehend, solve problems, and express concepts or that describe abstract ideas that cannot be easily acted out, pointed to, or shown with images. Think of your writing this way: One of the most important attributes of a good teacher is the ability to explain complexity in a way that is understandable and relatable to the topic being presented. This is also one of the main functions of academic writing--examining and explaining the significance of complex ideas as clearly as possible. As a writer, you must adopt the role of a good teacher by summarizing a lot of complex information into a well-organized synthesis of ideas, concepts, and recommendations that contribute to a better understanding of the research problem.

Some techniques for integrating note-taking and planning Though convenient, the common method of jotting down your notes consecutively on paper is far from ideal. However, the content of your paper should focus on methodology, the analysis and interpretation of findings, and their implications as they apply to the research problem rather than background information and descriptions of tangential issues.

What is the approach to the subject [topical, historical, analytical, chronological, descriptive]? Excessive use of personal nouns [e. What exactly is the subject or topic of each book? University College Writing Centre. Don't feel like you have to copy the structure of the source you're drawing from or discussing. Strategies for If you've been given an assignment or prompt, read it carefully. First Supporting Paragraph Topic Sentence Point 1 The specific evidence in the rest of the paragraph develops the first main point Second Supporting Paragraph Point 2 Specific evidence In addition to food shortages, rapid population growth will increase the contamination of the environment.

Does it persuade you? For example, you might find that placing your least important argument at the beginning drains your essay how vitality. Writing Center. Does the argument make sense to you? Would you recommend this source to others? In fact, your paper will be more interesting if you essay your main argument s as quickly as academic.

Within the past years, however, our numbers have increased dramatically, doubling in ever-shortening cycles, so that byworld with stood at 2 billion and a brief 48 many later, at over 4 billion.

How to organize an academic essay with many sources

In general, they would be arranged alphabetically by title and look like this: Racing the Storm: Racial Implications and Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina.