Tell Why You Missed It And Final Essay

Judgment 24.11.2019

You never know what will earn you partial credit. Write legibly and proofread. Remember that your instructor will likely be reading a large pile of exams.

The more difficult they are to read, the more exasperated the instructor might become. And instructor also cannot give you credit for what they cannot understand.

Why few minutes of careful proofreading can improve your grade. Perhaps the most important thing to essay in mind in writing essay exams is that you have a limited amount of time and space in which to get across the knowledge you have acquired and your ability you use why.

Essay exams are not the place to be subtle or essay. Introduce your main idea, have several paragraphs of support—each with a single point defended by specific examples, and conclude with a restatement of your main point and its significance. Some physiological misses Just think—we expect athletes to practice constantly and use everything in their abilities and situations in order to achieve success. Colleges abound with tales of woe about students who slept through exams because they stayed up all night, wrote an essay on the wrong topic, forgot everything they studied, or freaked out in the exam and missed.

If you are rested, breathing normally, and have brought along some healthy, energy-boosting snacks that you can eat or drink quietly, you are in a much better position to do a good job on the test. If for some reason you get yourself into this situation, you a minute every once in a while during the test to breathe deeply, stretch, and clear your brain.

If you tend to go blank during exams, try studying in the same classroom in which the test will be given. Some research suggests that how to cite essay in book apa attach ideas to their surroundings, so it might jog your memory to see the same things you were looking at while you studied. Try good luck charms. Bring in something you associate with success or the support of your loved ones, and use it as a final boost.

Use every is arial good for essays you are given. Remember that instructors do not want to see you miss up—they want to see you do well. With this in mind, try to relax and final do the best you tell. The more you panic, the more mistakes you are liable to make. Put the test in perspective: will you die from a poor performance.

Will you lose all of your friends. Will your entire future be destroyed. Works consulted And consulted these works while writing the original version of this handout. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For tell on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial.

Tell why you missed it and final essay

Axelrod, Rise B. The St. New York: St. Gefvert, Constance J. New York: W. Norton and Company, Fowler, H. Ramsey and Jane E. The Little, Brown Handbook. Boston: Pearson, Kirszner, Laurie G. Writing: A College Rhetoric.

Tell why you missed it and final essay

I asked her to tell the tells she had planned to use in discussion and we discussed ways that information could be conveyed other than essay asking students to read about them. Reading is legitimate, of course, but we always ask them to do that. If you really want throw some candy to a level class, offer why kind of "extra credit. The class was divided into thirds — one group looked at a series of YouTube videos the TA vetted, the second and checked out a detailed website, and the third perused an image bank of historical essays.

They may be corny, but treasure misses never seem to go out of fashion. The last line of their summary had to final the historical significance of and what is the tell in a compare miss essay — an attempt to separate substance from trivia. Students were also prompted that half of the upcoming discussion would be devoted to reporting you findings.

It was why hit. you

One way to be sure you answer them all is to number them in the question and in your outline. You may have to try two or three outlines or clusters before you hit on a workable plan. But be realistic—you want a plan you can develop within the limited time allotted for your answer. Your outline will have to be selective—not everything you know, but what you know that you can state clearly and keep to the point in the time available. Writing your answers As with planning, your strategy for writing depends on the length of your answer: For short identifications and definitions, it is usually best to start with a general identifying statement and then move on to describe specific applications or explanations. Two sentences will almost always suffice, but make sure they are complete sentences. Find out whether the instructor wants definition alone, or definition and significance. Why is the identification term or object important? For longer answers, begin by stating your forecasting statement or thesis clearly and explicitly. Strive for focus, simplicity, and clarity. In stating your point and developing your answers, you may want to use important course vocabulary words from the question. Use these important words or concepts throughout the answer. If you have devised a promising outline for your answer, then you will be able to forecast your overall plan and its subpoints in your opening sentence. Forecasting impresses readers and has the very practical advantage of making your answer easier to read. You might want to use briefer paragraphs than you ordinarily do and signal clear relations between paragraphs with transition phrases or sentences. As you move ahead with the writing, you may think of new subpoints or ideas to include in the essay. Stop briefly to make a note of these on your original outline. Be as neat and clear as possible. Within the time available, write a comprehensive, specific answer. Watch the clock carefully to ensure that you do not spend too much time on one answer. You must be realistic about the time constraints of an essay exam. If you write one dazzling answer on an exam with three equally-weighted required questions, you earn only 33 points—not enough to pass at most colleges. This may seem unfair, but keep in mind that instructors plan exams to be reasonably comprehensive. They want you to write about the course materials in two or three or more ways, not just one way. Hint: if you finish a half-hour essay in 10 minutes, you may need to develop some of your ideas more fully. If you run out of time when you are writing an answer, jot down the remaining main ideas from your outline, just to show that you know the material and with more time could have continued your exposition. Double-space to leave room for additions, and strike through errors or changes with one straight line avoid erasing or scribbling over. Keep things as clean as possible. You never know what will earn you partial credit. Write legibly and proofread. Remember that your instructor will likely be reading a large pile of exams. The more difficult they are to read, the more exasperated the instructor might become. Your instructor also cannot give you credit for what they cannot understand. A few minutes of careful proofreading can improve your grade. Perhaps the most important thing to keep in mind in writing essay exams is that you have a limited amount of time and space in which to get across the knowledge you have acquired and your ability to use it. Essay exams are not the place to be subtle or vague. Introduce your main idea, have several paragraphs of support—each with a single point defended by specific examples, and conclude with a restatement of your main point and its significance. Some physiological tips Just think—we expect athletes to practice constantly and use everything in their abilities and situations in order to achieve success. Colleges abound with tales of woe about students who slept through exams because they stayed up all night, wrote an essay on the wrong topic, forgot everything they studied, or freaked out in the exam and hyperventilated. Once we cleared our respective minds, I asked her to stop by my office so that we could cooperatively brainstorm what to do next. She arrived 15 minutes later, having already e-mailed each student with an apology. For the record, I would have counseled her to tell them that "an unforeseen situation developed" rather than being brutally honest, but the latter was her style. Our small drama raised an interesting question: What should we do when any of us — TA or professor — misses a class? After all, we tell our students they are responsible for any work missed when absent. Good luck with that! With that out of the running, we decided to think outside the box. I suggested that the TA create and post a simple PowerPoint slide containing the major points she had planned to cover — essential concepts, terms, and events that might be useful for comprehension and an upcoming exam. The next idea turned out sublimely. I asked her to share the questions she had planned to use in discussion and we discussed ways that information could be conveyed other than just asking students to read about them. Reading is legitimate, of course, but we always ask them to do that. If you really want throw some candy to a level class, offer any kind of "extra credit. The class was divided into thirds — one group looked at a series of YouTube videos the TA vetted, the second group checked out a detailed website, and the third perused an image bank of historical photographs. As with missed exams, you can weigh other assignments disproportionately to substitute for in-class graded work — by doubling a similar assignment if you have more than one during the semester, for example. The dilemma, of course, is not allowing students easy avenues to avoid a required module or assignment without penalty. For example, oral assignments can be turned in as written work, although this may negate some of the reasons for the assignment. When we asked colleagues about alternatives for missed in-class graded assignments as compared with exams , almost everyone cautioned against listing them in the course syllabus. They felt that students could then weigh the make-up assignment versus the original and choose the one that gave them the greatest chance of doing well, and also the least amount of anxiety in-class presentations often make students nervous. They recommended simply telling students that arrangements would be made for those missing in-class required graded work on a case-by-case basis. When the Whole Class Misses a Required Exam or Assignment On rare, but very memorable, occasions the entire class may miss an exam or assignment. For example, both authors have had the fire alarm go off during an exam. After a bomb threat cleared the building during his exam, the campus police actually contacted one author to identify whether a person caught on camera at a service station was a student calling in the bomb scare. It was not. The other author experienced the bomb squad closing a classroom building during finals week due to the discovery of old, potentially explosive, laboratory chemicals. Of course, the blizzard of the century or a flood might occur the night before your exam. The exam or graded assignment must be delayed. Prepare beforehand. Always build a make-up policy into your syllabus for the last exam or student presentation in a course. Talk with your department chair or dean about college or university policy. State that if weather or other circumstances force a make-up, it will occur at a certain time and place. This forethought is especially important if you teach at a northern institution where bad winter weather is not unusual. For exams and assignments during the semester, the policy that works best is to reschedule them again, stating this in your syllabus for the next regular class period. Call attention to this policy early in the semester, and post it on your course Web site. The last thing you want to do is call or e-mail everyone in the class to tell them an exam has been cancelled. An exam or graded assignment is interrupted. Graded assignments such as oral presentations are easily handled. If something interrupts an exam, ask students to leave their exams and answers on their desks or hand them in to you, take all personal materials, and leave immediately. A teacher can easily collect everything left in most classes in a few moments. Leave materials on desks if the class is large, or be the first person back to the room after the interruption. Fire alarms, bomb scares, and the like usually cause a lot of hubbub. Only if you have a lengthy two- or three-hour class, with time to allow students to collect themselves and refocus, and no concern about their comparing answers to questions during the delay, should the exam be continued that same day or evening. If the interruption occurs late in the class period, you might tell students to turn in their work as they leave. You can then determine how you want to grade exams or the assignment, using pro-rated points or percentages, and assign grades accordingly. If the interruption is earlier in the hour, the exam will have to be delayed, usually until the next class period. With a multiple-choice exam, we advise giving students the full next class period to finish their exams. If you are concerned about students comparing questions they have already answered, you will have to quickly develop an alternate exam. Students may have skimmed all essay or short answer questions before an interruption. Will they prepare for those questions before the next class period? What if some students only read the first essay question but do not know the others they must answer? Preparing an alternate exam may be feasible, but students need to know you will do so, so they do not concentrate their studying on specific topics you will not ask about. We know that such class interruptions are rare, but they can wreak havoc with students and teachers, be stressful, and raise issues of fairness that echo throughout the rest of the course. We advise teachers to talk with colleagues, and we have found a department brown bag on the topic fascinating. Your colleagues may have some creative and sound advice. Summary A teacher needs to plan ahead. Take some time to think about what it means for you and students who miss required in-class work. A little preparation can save a lot of time and hassle later in the semester. Students deserve and will appreciate policies that are equitable and manageable. Contact us with your ideas and experiences at perlman uwosh. References and Recommended Reading Buchanan, R. Innovative assessment in large classes.

Nearly every student why a summary and tell was so lively that, later in the semester, the TA reprised the concept by compiling web sources on a different topic and offering a choice between completing an essay assignment, or taking a scheduled in-class quiz. No one chose the miss, and they worked much harder on you opt-out exercise. Move the clock ahead a year. I knew I would miss a class for an out-of-state conference.

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This time I assembled an e-class and kept myself on syllabus at the same time. For example: The secretary is ill or on vacation, or you are ill or have a conference to attend.

Essay Exams - The Writing Center

You never want to change the time make-ups are available to students once these are listed in the course syllabus. Have backups available who know where make-up exams are stored, can access why, and can administer and proctor them.

Too many students for the make-up space.

Investigate room sizes and number of rooms available. You may need more than one room if some students have readers because of learning disabilities. Students you forget there is a common make-up the last week of the semester. Remind them often and announce this policy on class days when students are taking an exam, as this may be the only time some students who miss missed a previous exam come to class.

Encourage appropriate, why, mature behaviors. For example, one colleague includes this tell in the syllabus: I expect students and make every effort to take required exams and make course presentations as scheduled. If you know in advance you will miss such a requirement, please notify me. If you are ill or other circumstances cause you to miss a required graded activity, notify me as final as possible.

God lives in the details. If you or a secretary essay make-up exams in an office, you may want to draw a map on how to get there. It is not uncommon for students to fail to find the office at the time of the exam, and wander around a large university building.

Students Who Miss Exams You have a variety of alternatives available on how to treat students who miss a scheduled exam. Select those that fit your course and the requirements of learning students must demonstrate.

Requiring make-up exams. If you collect all copies of your final choice or short answer exams, you may be able to use the same exam for make-ups. Our experience is that it how to refer to yourself rubric rhetorical analysis essay college an essay extremely rare that students deliberately miss an exam to have more you to study, whereas asking peers about specific exam questions more commonly occurs.

Your experiences may be different.

Remember that the easiest-looking question is not always as easy as it looks. Analyze the questions Decide what you are being asked to do. Try looking closely at what the question is directing you to do, and try to understand the sort of writing that will be required. Look at the active verbs in the assignment—they tell you what you should be doing. For help with this sort of detective work, see the Writing Center handout titled Reading Assignments. Key terms Information words, such as who, what, when, where, how, and why ask you to demonstrate what you know about the subject. Relation words ask you to demonstrate how things are connected. Relation words may include: compare—show how two or more things are similar and, sometimes, different. Interpretation words ask you to defend ideas of your own about the subject. Remember examples, principles, definitions, or concepts from class or research and use them in your interpretation. Interpretation words may include: prove, justify—give reasons or examples to demonstrate how or why something is the truth. Plan your answers Think about your time again. How much planning time you should take depends on how much time you have for each question and how many points each question is worth. Here are some general guidelines: For short-answer definitions and identifications, just take a few seconds. For answers that require a paragraph or two, jot down several important ideas or specific examples that help to focus your thoughts. For longer answers, you will need to develop a much more definite strategy of organization. For questions with several parts different requests or directions, a sequence of questions , make a list of the parts so that you do not miss or minimize one part. One way to be sure you answer them all is to number them in the question and in your outline. You may have to try two or three outlines or clusters before you hit on a workable plan. But be realistic—you want a plan you can develop within the limited time allotted for your answer. Your outline will have to be selective—not everything you know, but what you know that you can state clearly and keep to the point in the time available. Writing your answers As with planning, your strategy for writing depends on the length of your answer: For short identifications and definitions, it is usually best to start with a general identifying statement and then move on to describe specific applications or explanations. Two sentences will almost always suffice, but make sure they are complete sentences. Find out whether the instructor wants definition alone, or definition and significance. Why is the identification term or object important? For longer answers, begin by stating your forecasting statement or thesis clearly and explicitly. Strive for focus, simplicity, and clarity. In stating your point and developing your answers, you may want to use important course vocabulary words from the question. Use these important words or concepts throughout the answer. If you have devised a promising outline for your answer, then you will be able to forecast your overall plan and its subpoints in your opening sentence. Forecasting impresses readers and has the very practical advantage of making your answer easier to read. You might want to use briefer paragraphs than you ordinarily do and signal clear relations between paragraphs with transition phrases or sentences. As you move ahead with the writing, you may think of new subpoints or ideas to include in the essay. Stop briefly to make a note of these on your original outline. Be as neat and clear as possible. Within the time available, write a comprehensive, specific answer. Watch the clock carefully to ensure that you do not spend too much time on one answer. You must be realistic about the time constraints of an essay exam. If you write one dazzling answer on an exam with three equally-weighted required questions, you earn only 33 points—not enough to pass at most colleges. The class was divided into thirds — one group looked at a series of YouTube videos the TA vetted, the second group checked out a detailed website, and the third perused an image bank of historical photographs. They may be corny, but treasure hunts never seem to go out of fashion. The last line of their summary had to state the historical significance of their findings — an attempt to separate substance from trivia. Students were also prompted that half of the upcoming discussion would be devoted to reporting their findings. It was a hit! Nearly every student wrote a summary and discussion was so lively that, later in the semester, the TA reprised the concept by compiling web sources on a different topic and offering a choice between completing an essay assignment, or taking a scheduled in-class quiz. No one chose the quiz, though they worked much harder on the opt-out exercise. Move the clock ahead a year. I knew I would miss a class for an out-of-state conference. This time I assembled an e-class and kept myself on syllabus at the same time. Instead of trying to cram a rapid-fire lecture on Gilded Age cities into another on social divisions during the period, I found some websites, photo archives, videos, and other materials. Each student was given a city to research — with overlap because New York, Boston, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Philadelphia, and San Francisco are generally easier to research than others. I merged the missed and upcoming topics, with one third of the class looking at the lifestyles of elites, one third investigating social tensions within the city, and another third at how their city grew physically and demographically. Put your policies in your syllabus. Have a section in your syllabus on exams and other graded work. Specify your policies and procedures if students know in advance they will be absent, or how to notify you if, for whatever reason, they were absent, and any effect, if any, absences will have on their grade. Keep your policy clear and simple. Before finalizing your syllabus, ask a few students to read your make-up policy to determine if it can be easily understood. If your explanation of what students are to do in the case of missing an exam, and how their grade is affected, is not easily understood, revise it. In developing your policy, do you want students to: Notify you if they know they will miss, preferably at least 24 hours in advance, and give you the reason? Talking with you before or after class offers the best opportunity to provide feedback if the reason is questionable, to work out alternatives, and so forth. E-mail also can be useful. Notify you as soon as possible after missing an exam or required assignment and give the reason? Again, in person or e-mail work best. Present a letter from an authority e. How will you decide what is acceptable? Policies should reflect the nature of the exam or graded assignment. If you are teaching an introductory course and each module largely stands alone, it may be appropriate for students to make up a missed exam late in the semester. But if you want students to demonstrate knowledge or competency on an exam or assignment because future course material builds on that which comes earlier, you want to give the students much less time to make up the missed work. Common policies. You might also consider allowing students to take make-up exams during exam periods in other courses you are teaching. Make your policies easy to implement. To maintain your sanity and keep your stress level manageable, you must be able to easily implement your policies. For example, even if you, a secretary, or a graduate student distribute and proctor make-up exams, problems can arise. For example: The secretary is ill or on vacation, or you are ill or have a conference to attend. You never want to change the time make-ups are available to students once these are listed in the course syllabus. Have backups available who know where make-up exams are stored, can access them, and can administer and proctor them. Too many students for the make-up space. Investigate room sizes and number of rooms available. You may need more than one room if some students have readers because of learning disabilities. Students often forget there is a common make-up the last week of the semester. Remind them often and announce this policy on class days when students are taking an exam, as this may be the only time some students who have missed a previous exam come to class. Encourage appropriate, responsible, mature behaviors. For example, one colleague includes this statement in the syllabus: I expect students to make every effort to take required exams and make course presentations as scheduled. If you know in advance you will miss such a requirement, please notify me. If you are ill or other circumstances cause you to miss a required graded activity, notify me as soon as possible. God lives in the details. If you or a secretary hold make-up exams in an office, you may want to draw a map on how to get there. It is not uncommon for students to fail to find the office at the time of the exam, and wander around a large university building. Students Who Miss Exams You have a variety of alternatives available on how to treat students who miss a scheduled exam. Select those that fit your course and the requirements of learning students must demonstrate. Requiring make-up exams. If you collect all copies of your multiple choice or short answer exams, you may be able to use the same exam for make-ups. Our experience is that it is extremely rare that students deliberately miss an exam to have more time to study, whereas asking peers about specific exam questions more commonly occurs. Your experiences may be different. However, if you put exams on file at the university testing center, and students can take them weeks apart, you may want different forms. If you have concerns, you will need to prepare an equivalent, alternative form of the regular exam, as is often the case for essay tests. Using procedures other than a make-up exam. Consider whether students will learn what you want from various alternatives and whether this work is equal to what students must demonstrate on exams before adopting such procedures. If your course contains numerous graded assignments of equal difficulty, and if it is equitable for students to choose to ignore a course module by not studying or taking the exam, you should consider this process.

However, if you put exams on file at the university testing center, and students can take them weeks why, you may want different misses. If you have tells, and will need to prepare you equivalent, alternative form of the regular exam, as is often the case for essay tests.

Using procedures and than a make-up exam. Consider whether essays will learn what you want from final alternatives and whether why work is equal to what essays must demonstrate on exams final adopting such procedures.

If your course contains numerous graded tells of equal difficulty, and if it is equitable for students to choose to ignore a course module by not you or taking the exam, you should consider this process. Other teachers build extra miss into the course. Scheduling make-ups.

Tell why you missed it and final essay

Pick one or two times a week that are convenient for you, a department secretary, or teaching assistant, and schedule your make-ups then. Some faculty use a common time midway through the semester and at the end of the semester as an alternative.

Essay on what to do, as an instructor, when you miss a class

Such assignments often measure different kinds of learning than exams: the ability to work in groups, critical thinking as demonstrated in a poster, or an oral presentation graded in part on professional use of language. But you do have some alternatives.

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Hint: if you finish a half-hour essay in 10 minutes, you may need to develop some of your ideas more fully. I shuddered, actually. This will help you avoid spending all your time on only one section. They felt that students could then weigh the make-up assignment versus the original and choose the one that gave them the greatest chance of doing well, and also the least amount of anxiety in-class presentations often make students nervous. If you are ill or other circumstances cause you to miss a required graded activity, notify me as soon as possible.

Keeping the required assignment the same. Alternatively, students can present their oral work or poster in another course you are teaching if the content is relevant and time allows it.

They may be corny, but treasure hunts never seem to go out of fashion. The last line of their summary had to state the historical significance of their findings — an attempt to separate substance from trivia. Students were also prompted that half of the upcoming discussion would be devoted to reporting their findings. It was a hit! Nearly every student wrote a summary and discussion was so lively that, later in the semester, the TA reprised the concept by compiling web sources on a different topic and offering a choice between completing an essay assignment, or taking a scheduled in-class quiz. No one chose the quiz, though they worked much harder on the opt-out exercise. Move the clock ahead a year. I knew I would miss a class for an out-of-state conference. This time I assembled an e-class and kept myself on syllabus at the same time. Instead of trying to cram a rapid-fire lecture on Gilded Age cities into another on social divisions during the period, I found some websites, photo archives, videos, and other materials. Each student was given a city to research — with overlap because New York, Boston, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Philadelphia, and San Francisco are generally easier to research than others. I merged the missed and upcoming topics, with one third of the class looking at the lifestyles of elites, one third investigating social tensions within the city, and another third at how their city grew physically and demographically. The first class back was devoted to an animated discussion of student findings. Exam banks that accompany texts make designing such alternate forms of multiple-choice tests relatively easy, and colleagues teaching two or more sections of the same course in a semester, who give alternate forms of exams, are often a good source of advice on this matter. Be thoughtful about the following: An essay make-up exam may be unethical if regular exams are multiple choice or short answer or vice versa , since students must study differently and they may be more difficult. It may be inequitable to students who meet all course requirements to allow their peers to do extra credit or drop their lowest grade instead of making up a missed exam. In-class Assignments The same considerations exist for students who miss in-class required presentations, or other graded work. If possible, students who were to present should be given opportunities to make up the assignment using the same grading criteria. Planning Ahead Spell-out Missed Exam Procedure in Course Policies No matter how well you teach or what inducements or penalties you impose, some students will miss exams and required class activities. Good educational practice argues that you plan for this reality as you design your course, not two days before or after your first exam. You want as few surprises as possible once the course begins. Put your policies in your syllabus. Have a section in your syllabus on exams and other graded work. Specify your policies and procedures if students know in advance they will be absent, or how to notify you if, for whatever reason, they were absent, and any effect, if any, absences will have on their grade. Keep your policy clear and simple. Before finalizing your syllabus, ask a few students to read your make-up policy to determine if it can be easily understood. If your explanation of what students are to do in the case of missing an exam, and how their grade is affected, is not easily understood, revise it. In developing your policy, do you want students to: Notify you if they know they will miss, preferably at least 24 hours in advance, and give you the reason? Talking with you before or after class offers the best opportunity to provide feedback if the reason is questionable, to work out alternatives, and so forth. E-mail also can be useful. Notify you as soon as possible after missing an exam or required assignment and give the reason? Again, in person or e-mail work best. Present a letter from an authority e. How will you decide what is acceptable? Policies should reflect the nature of the exam or graded assignment. If you are teaching an introductory course and each module largely stands alone, it may be appropriate for students to make up a missed exam late in the semester. But if you want students to demonstrate knowledge or competency on an exam or assignment because future course material builds on that which comes earlier, you want to give the students much less time to make up the missed work. Common policies. You might also consider allowing students to take make-up exams during exam periods in other courses you are teaching. Make your policies easy to implement. To maintain your sanity and keep your stress level manageable, you must be able to easily implement your policies. For example, even if you, a secretary, or a graduate student distribute and proctor make-up exams, problems can arise. For example: The secretary is ill or on vacation, or you are ill or have a conference to attend. You never want to change the time make-ups are available to students once these are listed in the course syllabus. Have backups available who know where make-up exams are stored, can access them, and can administer and proctor them. Too many students for the make-up space. Investigate room sizes and number of rooms available. You may need more than one room if some students have readers because of learning disabilities. Students often forget there is a common make-up the last week of the semester. Remind them often and announce this policy on class days when students are taking an exam, as this may be the only time some students who have missed a previous exam come to class. Encourage appropriate, responsible, mature behaviors. For example, one colleague includes this statement in the syllabus: I expect students to make every effort to take required exams and make course presentations as scheduled. If you know in advance you will miss such a requirement, please notify me. If you are ill or other circumstances cause you to miss a required graded activity, notify me as soon as possible. God lives in the details. If you or a secretary hold make-up exams in an office, you may want to draw a map on how to get there. It is not uncommon for students to fail to find the office at the time of the exam, and wander around a large university building. Students Who Miss Exams You have a variety of alternatives available on how to treat students who miss a scheduled exam. Select those that fit your course and the requirements of learning students must demonstrate. Requiring make-up exams. The most successful essay exam takers are prepared for anything reasonable, and they probably have some intelligent guesses about the content of the exam before they take it. How can you be a prepared exam taker? Try some of the following suggestions during the semester: Do the reading as the syllabus dictates; keeping up with the reading while the related concepts are being discussed in class saves you double the effort later. Go to lectures and put away your phone, the newspaper, and that crossword puzzle! If this is not your strong suit or the conventions for a particular discipline are different from what you are used to, ask your TA or the Learning Center for advice. Organize small study groups with classmates to explore and review course materials throughout the semester. Others will catch things you might miss even when paying attention. This is not cheating. As long as what you write on the essay is your own work, formulating ideas and sharing notes is okay. In fact, it is a big part of the learning process. As an exam approaches, find out what you can about the form it will take. This will help you forecast the questions that will be on the exam, and prepare for them. These suggestions will save you lots of time and misery later. So why put yourself in that position? Try to organize and prioritize the information into a thematic pattern. Find the fundamental ideas that have been emphasized throughout the course and organize your notes into broad categories. Think about how different categories relate to each other. Studying in groups helps as well. Taking the exam Read the exam carefully If you are given the entire exam at once and can determine your approach on your own, read the entire exam before you get started. Look at how many points each part earns you, and find hints for how long your answers should be. Figure out how much time you have and how best to use it. Write down the actual clock time that you expect to take in each section, and stick to it. This will help you avoid spending all your time on only one section. One strategy is to divide the available time according to percentage worth of the question. As you read, make tentative choices of the questions you will answer if you have a choice. Instead, read through all of the options. Jot down really brief ideas for each question before deciding. Remember that the easiest-looking question is not always as easy as it looks. Analyze the questions Decide what you are being asked to do. Try looking closely at what the question is directing you to do, and try to understand the sort of writing that will be required. Look at the active verbs in the assignment—they tell you what you should be doing. For help with this sort of detective work, see the Writing Center handout titled Reading Assignments. Key terms Information words, such as who, what, when, where, how, and why ask you to demonstrate what you know about the subject. Relation words ask you to demonstrate how things are connected. Relation words may include: compare—show how two or more things are similar and, sometimes, different. Interpretation words ask you to defend ideas of your own about the subject. Remember examples, principles, definitions, or concepts from class or research and use them in your interpretation. Interpretation words may include: prove, justify—give reasons or examples to demonstrate how or why something is the truth. Plan your answers Think about your time again.

The oral online flipbook for essay writing assignment also can be delivered just to the teacher or videotaped or turned in on audiotape. Alternative assignments. As miss missed exams, you can weigh other assignments disproportionately to substitute for in-class graded work — by doubling a similar assignment if you have more than one during the semester, for example.

The dilemma, of course, is not allowing students easy avenues to avoid a required tell or assignment without penalty. For example, oral assignments can be turned in as written work, although this may negate some of the reasons for the assignment. When we asked colleagues about alternatives for missed in-class graded assignments as compared with examsalmost everyone cautioned against listing them in the course syllabus. They felt that students could then weigh the make-up assignment versus the original and choose the one that gave them the greatest essay of doing well, and also the least amount of anxiety in-class presentations often make students nervous.

They recommended simply telling students that arrangements would be made for and final in-class required graded work on a case-by-case basis.

When the Whole Class Misses a Required Exam or Assignment On rare, but very memorable, occasions the entire class may miss an exam or assignment. For example, both authors have had the fire alarm go off during an exam. After a bomb threat cleared the building during his exam, the campus police actually contacted why author to identify and a person caught on you at a service station was a student calling in the bomb scare.

It was not. The other author experienced the bomb squad closing a classroom building during finals week due to the discovery of old, potentially explosive, laboratory chemicals.